Online proceedings for the IRCT General Assembly and 10th International Scientific Symposium - Delivering on the Promise of the Right to Rehabilitation

Return
Time: 15:00 to 15:20 Download Presentation

Delivering on the right to rehabilitation: Successes, lessons and challenges: A Kenya civil society perspective

Presenter(s) and co-author(s): Ms. Hilda Nyatete ( Independent Medical Legal Unit (IMLU) - Kenya ), Mr. Peter Kiama - Executive Director ( Independent Medical Legal Unit (IMLU) - Kenya )

Background

The Independent Medico-Legal Unit, a member of IRCT, has supported rehabilitation and redress for over 4,000 victims of torture and ill-treatment in Kenya since 1993. We have applied innovative approaches to enhance access to comprehensive rehabilitation for survivors as per the United Nations Convention against Torture and General Comment No. 3. This `Oral Presentation' will be based on a paper covering: experiences providing rehabilitation as a global justice, legal and public health issue; state accountability; interface with public and private health systems; use of clinical evidence for advocacy and communications; resourcing rehabilitation; broadening the basis for survivor identification, referrals and  rehabilitation.

Methodology

This paper is based on desk review; client records; various surveys, research and other reports published by IMLU and organisations and institutions, including UNCAT and other human rights treaty bodies. A set of variables will be identified to inform the desk review and the analysis and presentation of the information collected. These variables will be largely informed by the topics under Theme 2. The review and use of the material will strictly adhere to ethical practices in the field of survivor support including confidentiality and do-no-harm approach.

All care will be taken not to mention real survivor names or refer to places or occasions that might lead to survivor identification. The paper will share IMLU's holistic model working through network of volunteer professionals (doctors, lawyers, trauma counsellors, journalists and monitors) who are trained on international best practices and provide rehabilitation and redress support from multiple sites in the country without IMLU establishing often expensive and unsustainable physical presence in those locations.

Results

The paper will draw out what we have learned over the years using a holistic approach to supporting survivors of torture and what others can learn from our experiences. It will also share reflections on the successes, challenges and lessons of contextualizing global approaches to a local situation in relation to providing rehabilitation as a global justice, legal and public health issue; state accountability; interface with public and private health systems; use of clinical evidence for advocacy and communications; resourcing rehabilitation; broadening the basis for survivor identification, and referrals and rehabilitation.

Funding & No Conflicts Declaration

There are no funding implications or conflict of interest issues with regard to my employment or IMLU's membership at IRCT.

By continuing your visit to this website, you accept the use of cookies in accordance with our privacy policy. Yes I accept